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Antique Knives

Antique knives, antique kukris have had a few spellings, most common are kukri and khukuri, but basically it’s a mid-length curved knife comprising a distinctive Cho (notch) that is the national knife of Nepal. This shape is believed to have existed 2500 years ago; the Kopis used by the Greeks is the probable source of its design. In our modern times the kukri really came to prominence outside Nepal with the Nepal War in 1814-15 after the formation of British Gurkha Army. It was carried in a wood sheath covered in leather, most having a wooden grip or horn and traditionally having two small knives (one small knife for chores and the other left unsharpened for flint striking and to knock burrs from the main blade), it is one of the most famous and feared knives of the world. 

To some the most appealing and distinctive part of the kukri is the notch or Cho cut into the blade directly in front of the grip near its base. Its unique shape and utility objectives have been the source of much debate. The notch works as a blood stop to prevent fluid from going towards the handle so that a good grip can be maintained. Additionally it was to stop the sharpener when in use from reaching the handle. Religiously it signifies the Hindu fertility symbol (OM) and represents the sacred cows hoof. 

What is true is that all traditional kukri’s carry this notch. You can buy original kukri's from the arsenal of the Royal Nepalese Army as well as find modern day versions and machetes online at Atlanta Cutlery. Historic in every sense of the word, you have the rare opportunity to own a legendary antique Nepalese kukri since originally issued to Gurkha soldiers over a century ago. Discovered in the Royal Palace of Lagan Silekhana in Kathmandu they are real military treasures of a bygone era.

Learn more about the ancient Kukri in our learning center.


Top Customer Reviews

Review of: WWI Issue Vintage Kukri

Being a collector and a confirmed kukri-person, this was added to my kukri/knife collection awhile back (as have others from the AC buy-out of old Nepalese khuks).... It's sorta rough-looking but in fine shape as a USER kuk... I have refrained (so far) from cleaning it more than putting an edge on it and wiping it down good with knife oil.. Havent gotten to making my own leather sheath yet, as with most of my USER knives. Got it mainly for the collectability, as when these Nepalese antiques are sold out, there will be no more of them!
This does cut and chop just fine, and the wood grip is in decent, usable condition. only "complaint" is the small size of the grip. But that is part of the deal when buying knives like this- obviously these were made for issue to people with smaller hands than are common in 21'st century America. But it cuts just fine and seems to be made of good steel... especially considering the primitive conditions the steel was made under, and worked into a fighting blade. Eventually Godwilling I will get
around to making a carry sheath worthy of a primitive chopper like this! Am considering getting a blade or two to make my own grips for..
Reviewed by: Ranald, November 13, 2020

Review of: WWI Issue Vintage Kukri

This was added to my kukri/knife collection awhile back (as have others from the AC buy-out of old Nepalese khuks).... It's sorta rough-looking but in fine shape as a USER kuk..I have refrained (so far) from cleaning it more than putting an edge on it and wiping it down good with knife oil.. Havent gotten to making my own leather sheath yet, as I do with most of my USER knives. Got it mainly for the collectability, as when these Nepalese antiques are sold out, there will be no more of them!
This does cut and chop just fine, and the wood grip is in decent, useable condition. only "complaint" is the small size of the grip. But that is part of the deal when buying knives like this- obviously these were made for issue to people with smaller hands than are common in 21'st century America. But it cuts just fine and seems to be made of good steel... especially considering the primitive conditions the steel was made under, and worked into a fighting blade. Eventually Godwilling I will get
around to making a carry sheath worthy of a primitive chopper like this! Am considering getting a blade or two to make my own grips for..
Reviewed by: Ranald, November 13, 2020

Review of: Bhojpure Traditional Kukri Blade

I bought one of the bjojpure blades and combined it with a WW1 brass knucks trench knife handle. Awsome weapon. The blade was beautiful under the grease. I'm buying more before they are gone forever,
Timothy Childs  Co. C 40th Va. Infantry CSA
Reviewed by: Timothy, June 04, 2020

Review of: Bhojpure Traditional Kukri Blade

I bought this bojpure blade along with a longleaf blade. This bojpure is over an inch longer than the longleaf, and has a broader blade. It is about two inches longer than my modern production, traditional style kukri and has a much broader blade. It is far more imposing as a weapon. It is also made of a vastly tougher grade of steel. Harder than any weapon in my collection. I did not pay for hand selection, and this blade is in rough condition. The edge looks to have suffered major damage at some point and was crudely repaired. The tip is broken off. None of this detracts from this beautiful antique. I have attached a custom handle. I am leaving the heavy patina intact and will touch up the edge so that it will continue to live on as a fearsome weapon.
Reviewed by: Jonathan, March 31, 2019

Review of: WWI Issue Vintage Kukri with Original Scabbard

Very satisfied  
It's in very good condition , I might order next one soon thanks.
Reviewed by: , July 28, 2017

Review of: Bhojpure Traditional Kukri Blade

The blade was in great shape and well protected in grease.  Once it was cleaned up I took a file to the edge checking the temper.  The spine is soft and the edge was very hard, perfect for a big chopper.  The next few days were spent mounting it on a horn handle and making a leather sheath.  After putting a shaving sharp convex edge on the blade (which didn't take much) it was ready to go.  Oak, Hickory and Elm have been getting cleared off of our property ever since, the edge still shaves!
Reviewed by: , May 11, 2017

Review of: Bhojpure Traditional Kukri Blade

Last one I purchased Came out beautiful. Definitely an old combat used Kukri. Under the cosmolene & rust it was stamped in ancient Sanskrit. Sent a photo to a knife maker in Napol who was able to have it translated for me. It now has a beautiful antler handle and is very impressive. Thanks
Reviewed by: James, April 07, 2016

Review of: Bhojpure Traditional Kukri Blade

Ordered one of these handless Blades.  It came well packed in a packetwith grease and all. After cleaning it is a nice blade (No handle)
Reviewed by: David, October 12, 2015

Review of: Longleaf Traditional Antique Kukri

Wow!!  Paid for the hand select.  Item arrived well packaged.  I took out the kukri from the plastic that it was shipped in and the blade appeared to be entirely covered in an old cosmoline type protective (which is a good thing).  I soaked it in mineral spirits (for about one hour) and the blade had absolutely no rust on it!!  There was some discoloration and a small pit, but wow what a nice antique kukri.  Like many reviews on the internet have stated about these longleaf kukris, there was a crack in the handle.  But the handle is tight, and it's an antique- hey it's not supposed to be perfect!!  All in all a very impressive longleaf antique kukri in great condition (in better condition then the BhojPure kukri that I ordered -that was in relatively good condition).  Once again, thank you Atlanta Cutlery for a beautiful item!!
Reviewed by: Dan, June 19, 2013

Review of: Longleaf Traditional Antique Kukri

It is a crude design but still completly useable and in great condition.
Reviewed by: Mckinley, July 27, 2012